Site Search:

 

Statistics:

Communications Data

 

Communications data embraces the ‘who’, ‘when’ and ‘where’ of a communication (but not the content of what was said or written). 

 

 

Figure 1: Number of authorisations and notices for communications data over the previous three years. For an explanation of the terms authorisation and notice please click here. To see a breakdown by public authority for 2014 please see Annex B (pages 90-94) of our March 2015 report.


Year

Authorisations and Notices

Urgent Oral Authorisations and Notices

2014

517,236

55,346

2013

514,608

42,293

2012

570,135

39,092

 

In 2014 - 88.9% of the 517,236 authorisations and notices were made by police forces and law enforcement agencies, 9.8% by the intelligence agencies, 0.4% by local authorities and 0.9% by ‘other’ public authorities.


 Figure 2: Breakdown of notices and authorisations by type of communications data under section 21(4) RIPA. Almost half of the requirements in 2014 were for subscriber information under section 21(4)(c). For an explanation of the three types of communications data please see Page 43 of our March 2015 report.

Figure 2

Figure 3: Breakdown by Statutory Necessity Purpose

Figure 3

Interception Warrants

 

An interception warrant can be issued by a Secretary of State under section 5(1) of RIPA. The conduct authorised by an interception warrant includes any conduct necessary to obtain the content of the communication and any related communications data (as defined in section 20 and Chapter II of Part I RIPA).


Figure 4: Number of new interception warrants issued in each of the years 2012-2014 and number extant at the close of each year for the nine interception agencies.

 

Year

Warrants issued

Warrants Extant at

31st December

2014

2,795

1,605

2013

2,760

1,669

2012

3,372

 Not recorded

 

 Figure 5: Breakdown of the interception warrants issued in 2014 by statutory purpose. The combination category represents those few warrants that were authorised for more than one statutory purpose. The vast majority of the serious crime warrants fell into one of the following five categories: unlawful supply of controlled drugs; firearms and violence; robbery and theft; financial crime; or smuggling / trafficking.

Figure 5

Sections

  • Statistics